Advert of the Day: The Many Facets of Marc Marquez.

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We all know Marc Marquez is a special MotoGP rider, but who knew he could be a guitar-maker, a chef and a beer-brewer too?

I jest, of course. That’s just part of the advert. Then again, would you really be surprised if this kid can do all of the above too apart from motorcycle racing?

P.S. It weirds me out a little bit to see him drinking beer already. I can still remember the days when he wasn’t allowed to drink the champagne on the podium!

That MotoGP Magic.

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I have a confession to make: Last week, I didn’t want to watch the 1st Argentine MotoGP.

I cannot really explain why. I was updated of the free practice and qualifying times through Twitter, but I just felt no zest, no sense of urgency nor excitement to actually watch the races. It was strange. Why was this happening?

So I made a “deal” with the MotoGP gods: If our home telly was free during the races, then I’d watch; if it wasn’t, then I’ll just (maybe) catch the repeat. As it turned out, the TV was free, and I did get to watch all three classes. In the end, I’m glad I did, because they all reminded me of why I am a MotoGP fan.

You see, I never expected to fall in love with MotoGP—but I totally and unequivocally did.

Many moons ago, I used to fume and seethe whenever I catch the MotoGP races on TV, mainly because they happened to be broadcast on the same channel as the Football and therefore, I cannot wait for them to be over and done with so I can watch my precious matches. While I was already an avid fan of F1 for many years, during that time I just cannot understand the fuss about motorbike racing.

“What is so fantastic about this stuff?” I’d wonder.

“Surely, driving a racecar is so much cooler and more exciting.”

I shrugged and thought to myself that I would never become a fan of motorbike racing. Four wheels all the way, baby!

However, I ended up eating a huge slice of humble pie. All thanks to a certain wee rider named Dani Pedrosa.

It was simply through serendipity that I got to know him: One day, I was flicking through the cable sports channels when I chanced upon a segment of a programme (I couldn’t even remember the name of it now) where the presenters were gushing about a certain Spanish motorbike racer named Dani Pedrosa. “He’s such a precocious rider! The next big thing in MotoGP!”, they excitedly proclaimed.  Long story short, I decided to see for myself what they were exalting and checked out a 250cc race one weekend on TV. I was nothing short of gobsmacked. Pedrosa rode the bike like he stole it and schooled the entire grid like nobody’s business. Boy, was he worth the hype and more. I finally saw with my own eyes what the big deal was. I dove headfirst into MotoGP Fandom and never looked back.

I followed Pedrosa into the MotoGP premier class in 2006. I was already aware of the legend of Valentino Rossi way before that but I only cared about supporting wee Dani. It was a curious sort of season, with Dani registering some notable records and yes, very nearly destroying his teammate’s championship hopes by that controversial move in Estoril. Going into more details on what I have experienced would be incredibly long, but yes, eight years, 4 teammates, numerous injuries and 3 different engines later—I’m still here, a full-fledged, ride-or-die Pedrosa fan.

Even the lower classes (previously the 125cc and 250cc classes, now known as Moto3 and Moto2) are nothing to be scoffed at, as the likes of Jorge Lorenzo, Casey Stoner, Dani Pedrosa and reigning Champion Marc Marquez are all distinguished alumni and some of the best battles and on-track scraps can be found there. If you want a glimpse of true grit and balls-to-the-wall action, check out Moto3 and Moto2. That’s where the future stars of premier class racing is honing their craft and you shall not be disappointed.

MotoGP has the drama (Rider rivalries! Team bickerings! Tyre issues!), the comedy (Rider bloopers! Awkward interviews! Behind the scenes shenanigans!), the art (They’re more than bikes, they’re sculptures! Look at the way they ride the bikes like it’s a dance!), the science (Just look at them lean angles!) and more. I’ve watched pure genius on track, questionable moves, wince-inducing crashes and even some deaths. There’s a certain passion in motorbike fans that’s just distinct from racecar fans–It’s infectious, delightful and all-consuming. See for yourself how packed and well-attended the MotoGP races are. You just never know what you’ll get to see and experience that day. And that’s where the magic lies.

F1 may be my First Motorsport Love, but MotoGP stole my heart in ways that are difficult to express.

Asking me to choose between F1 and MotoGP is like asking a mother to pick a favourite child. If F1 is the “cool” child, the one who’s always trying to reinvent itself, then MotoGP is the “devil-may-care, badass, wild child”. Perhaps this F1 vs MotoGP thing should be reserved for another article altogether. All I can say for now is that I’m just glad there’s enough capacity in my heart to love both racing series at the same time.

I have been to a few F1 races already but I have yet to go to my first-ever MotoGP race. I am determined to make it happen soon. Also, I’m still holding out hope that I would be able to learn how to ride a motorcycle and be able to own one.  See how much this series has infiltrated my life already?

So, what happened pre-Argentine MotoGP? That was merely a blip. It was me, not MotoGP that needed a reboot/attitude adjustment. My sincere apologies for ever doubting you, MotoGP.

This unlikely love story has a long way to go yet, and I’m quite excited to see how it will continue to develop. Here’s to unexpected loves and the thrill of unpredictability.

And if you’re still a non-believer, then just watch a race, give it a try and let its magic work on you. You’re welcome.

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